Why Loving (your) self may be more dangerous than you think

Guest Blog By Eddie Ssemakula.

We are living in interesting times; Silicon Valley has given us platforms of self-expression Grand Ma only dreamt about, if at all.

With that has come the ability to self promote, with anything, anywhere, not inherently bad things.

Yet with New media as the latest vehicle to our self-love, the devil seems to have lurked in the details.

We raise our fancy gadget and capture the new watch, we put our right leg forward and caption the photo, “life is what you make it, “living my life”, “haters gonna hate”, “believe in yourself”, “listen to your heart. ”

“Mobile Lovers” by Banksy

But what is going on? What if this self-obsession is what is going to eat us inside out?

Biblical writers, moved by God’s spirit, wrote telling their converted yet non-digital audience of the new life they had embraced, central to that new life was the idea that because Christ had made them new, their old self had been “buried with him “(Rom 6:4) and that had implications, folks in Philippi for example were to put “other peoples interests above theirs.” (2:4)

The former passions Peter explains in 1 Pet 1 involved self obsession, but now that they had come to Christ, the all-too common New Testament language applied to them too; “dying to self, decreasing so he may increase (John 3:30), and thinking highly of people not themselves. (Rom 12:3)

Now they needed to live a life of abandonment, they needed to put other peoples interests above theirs, narcissism was to die, it was a thing of forgetting self.

Tourists take a selfie during a desert safari trip in Egypt's Red Sea resort of Sharm El-Sheikh on November 4, 2015. Britain temporarily suspended flights from Sharm El-Sheikh as it was concerned a Russian airliner that crashed in Egypt may have been downed by a bomb, while the Islamic State group insisted it caused the disaster. STR/AFP/Getty Images
Tourists take a selfie during a desert safari trip in Egypt’s Red Sea resort of Sharm El-Sheikh on November 4, 2015. Britain temporarily suspended flights from Sharm El-Sheikh as it was concerned a Russian airliner that crashed in Egypt may have been downed by a bomb, while the Islamic State group insisted it caused the disaster. STR/AFP/Getty Images

Totally different from what often shows up in our newsfeed these days.

To love the image of God we represent is one thing, to underestimate our need for redemption is another.

Like Tim Keller, author of “Counterfeit gods” put it,

“We are more sinful and flawed than we ever dared believe, yet more loved and accepted in Jesus than we ever dared hope.”

None should be understated, and the latter, loving yourself, may actually be more dangerous than we ever thought.

Featured Image – Runners take a selfie during the ‘The Color Run Night’ in Stockholm on September 11, 2015. The Color Run founder, Travis Snyder, was inspired by the Indian Holi Festival, and decided to combine the idea with a 5km running experience. From the first event in the United States in January 2012 The Color Run has since spread across the globe leaving a trail of color and happy runners.

JONATHAN NACKSTRAND/AFP/Getty Images

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